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Hiking Austrian Alps

April 17th, 2014

Hiking Austrian Alps

Hiking Austrian alps, two-thirds of the Kitzbühel Alps lie within the Austrian province of Tyrol, the remaining third is in Salzburg province. They are about 80 kilometres (50 mi) long from east to west and 25 to 35 km wide. They extend from the Ziller valley and Tux Alps in the west to the Saalach river and Zell am See on Lake Zell (Zellersee) in the east. They are bordered to the south by the Zillertal Alps and the High Tauern mountain range on the other side of the Salzach River, on the north by the Inn River and the Northern Limestone Alps.

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Austria Photos Agriculture

April 17th, 2014

Austria Photos Agriculture

Austria Photos Agriculture

Austria Photos Agriculture

The share of agriculture in Austria in the Austrian economy declined steadily after World War II, agriculture continues to represent an important element of the economy because of its social and political significance. The Chamber of Agriculture remains on an equal level with the chambers of commerce and labour, although its members produce only a fraction of the GDP that industrial and commercial workers produce.

Agriculture Austria PhotosImage by Alex Saunders
In Austria, as in most other Western countries, the government has played an important role in agriculture since the end of War World II. The government has concentrated on mitigating social, regional, economic, and even environmental consequences of the sector's decline, as well as delaying the decline itself.

Agricultural policy has been carried out with different objectives and with different laws and policies depending on the times. at the early postwar years, the most important objectives were suoyurvival and self-sufficiency. As a poor country, Austria needed to be able to feed itself if its population was to survive.

By the 1950s, however, the policy was changing to a more global perspective, while keeping intact the traditional form economy. The government wanted to protect domestic production, stabilize agricultural markets, protect farmers' incomes, and improve the sector's ability to compete in Austria and abroad. Increasingly, the government began to believe in the importance of maintaining rural society as an objective in its own right, for social reasons, and to protect the environment and encourage tourism. Because of these aims, agricultural policy, more than any other economic policy, reflects a mixture of economic and noneconomic objectives and concerns. The principal aim, however, is to preserve the existing number of farms as much as possible.

Within the structure of the social partnership, various organizations work to maintain farm incomes and thus farm existence, among them the Grain Board, the Dairy Board, and the Livestock and Meat Commission. These organizations set basic support prices, taking into account domestic costs and local supply and demand, with only weak linkages to world market prices.

The boards and commission use a variety of measures to achieve their broad purposes. Among these measures are import restrictions, such as border controls and entry controls—some of which may be bilaterally negotiated—and variable import duties. If import restrictions are not sufficient to maintain prices because of excess production, the surplus is exported at subsidized prices (with the subsidies usually coming from federal or provincial authorities). Authorities also apply production controls, such as sales quotas or limits, on the size and density of livestock holdings. Quotas exist for many different products, with the quotas usually fixed on the basis of past production. Price and quality controls and limits also exist, especially with respect to different prices for different grades of wheat or milk. The government can also pay direct income supplements, but these payments are generally restricted to certain mountain farming zones and other equally disadvantaged areas. Subsidies are mainly paid by the federal government but may in some instances be paid by provincial governments.

Because of the complex system of price supports and market access limitations, the exact share of subsidy costs to the government and to consumers is virtually impossible to calculate. Experts estimate that the total cost to the federal and other governments for agricultural and forestry support during the late 1980s was approximately S16 billion a year, a level that would have been roughly at the same level as that of many other Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) governments but slightly higher than the EC average.

The economic research institute Österreichisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung (WIFO) estimated after a major 1989 study that about 71 percent of the cost of agricultural support was borne by consumers in the form of higher prices, with the taxpayers carrying the remaining 29 percent through such different programs as direct and indirect federal and provincial subsidies or various kinds of market regulation.

Austria's decision to enter the EU will have certain effects on its agriculture and forestry. Support prices in Austria are higher than those set under the EU's Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), although the two systems are in many ways similar. Austrian government-borne subsidy costs are at about the same level as those in the EU, but consumer-borne subsidy costs are higher, so food prices in Austria average about 30 percent higher than those in the EU. Full integration into the EU will thus compel a number of adjustments in Austria. These adjustments may be even more severe if they become effective at the same time that some East European countries with lower production costs enter the EU. Much depends, of course, on any reforms that may take place in the CAP.

Wikipedia

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Penken Austria Landscape Photography

April 17th, 2014

Penken Austria Landscape Photography

Penken Austria Landscape Photography
Winter Alpen Landscape on sale at - http://alex-saunders.artistwebsites.com - landscape photos, prints, and canvas wall art also large wall art of Scotland and Europe. Wall art products updated on a regular basis.

View from close to the Penken lift station. The Penken is reached by a Gondola system which located on the main street next to the Sport Hotel Strass, in the centre of the village, while the Ahorn Cable car, which as of 2008 is the largest cable car in Austria (160 passengers) is situated at the southern end of the town. Mayrhofen is a snowboard minded village with a funpark sponsored by Vans, and the snowboardhotel Gasthof Zillertal owned by the Dutch organisation 'SAIKO expeditions'. Mountaineer Peter Habeler and Downhill Racer Uli Spiess both come from Mayrhofen.
Wikipedia

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Landscape Photography Venice Storm

April 17th, 2014

Landscape Photography Venice Storm

Landscape Photography Venice Storm on sale at - http://alex-saunders.artistwebsites.com - landscape photos, prints, and canvas wall art also large wall art of Scotland and Europe. Wall art products updated on a regular basis.
The gondola is a traditional, flat-bottomed Venetian rowing boat, well suited to the conditions of the Venetian lagoon. For centuries gondolas were the chief means of transportation and most common watercraft within Venice. In modern times the iconic boats still have a role in public transport in the city, serving as traghetti (ferries) over the Grand Canal. They are also used in special regattas (rowing races) held amongst gondoliers. The gondola is propelled like punting, except an oar is used instead of a pole. Their primary role today, however, is to carry tourists on rides at fixed rates.
The gondola is propelled by a person (the gondolier) who stands facing the bow and rows with a forward stroke, followed by a compensating backward stroke. Contrary to popular belief, the gondola is never poled like a punt as the waters of Venice are too deep. Until the early 20th century, as many photographs attest, gondolas were often fitted with a "felze", a small cabin, to protect the passengers from the weather or from onlookers. Its windows could be closed with louvered shutters—the original "venetian blinds". After the elimination of the traditional felze—possibly in response to tourists complaining that it blocked the view—there survived for some decades a kind of vestigial summer awning, known as the "tendalin" (these can be seen on gondolas as late as the mid-1950s, in the film Summertime). While in previous centuries gondolas could be many different colors, a sumptuary law of Venice required that gondolas should be painted black, and they are customarily so painted now.
It is estimated that there were eight to ten thousand gondolas during the 17th and 18th century. There are just over four hundred in active service today, virtually all of them used for hire by tourists. Those few that are in private ownership are either hired out to Venetians for weddings or used for racing. Even though the Gondola by now has become a widely publicized icon of Venice, in the times of the Republic of Venice it was by far not the only means of transportation: on the map of Venice created by Jacopo de' Barbari in 1500 only a fraction of the boats are gondolas, the majority of boats are batellas, caorlinas, galleys and other boats - by now only a handful of batellas survive, and caorlinas are used for racing only.During their heyday as a means of public transports, teams of four men—three oarsmen and a fourth person, primarily shore-based and responsible for the booking and administration of the gondola (Il Rosso Riserva)—would share ownership of a gondola. However as the gondolas became more of a tourist attraction than a mode of public transport all but one of these cooperatives and their offices have closed. The category is now protected by the Institution for the Protection and Conservation of Gondolas and Gondoliers,[4] headquartered in the historical center of Venice.
Traghetti - foot passenger gondolas across the Grand Canal
The historical gondola was quite different from its modern evolution- the paintings of Canaletto and others show a much lower prow, a higher "ferro", and usually two rowers. The banana-shaped modern gondola was developed only in the 19th century by the boat-builder Tramontin, whose heirs still run the Tramontin boatyard. The construction of the gondola continued to evolve until the mid-20th century, when the city government prohibited any further modifications.
Wikipedia

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Culzean Castle Scotland

April 17th, 2014

Culzean Castle Scotland

Culzean Castle Scotland at sunset perched on the edge of the cliff, with two canoes in the sea below. Patches of the setting sun reflects off the cliff and castle as it sets at the cloudy horizon. This is not the usual view that you will find of This Scottish castle.
In 1945, the Kennedy family gave the castle and its grounds to the National Trust for Scotland (thus avoiding inheritance tax). In doing so, they stipulated that the apartment at the top of the castle be given to General of the Army Dwight D. Eisenhower in recognition of his role as Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces in Europe during the Second World War. The General first visited Culzean Castle in 1946 and stayed there four times, including once while President of the United States. An Eisenhower exhibition occupies one of the rooms, with mementoes of his lifetime.

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European Landscape Photography Afterglow

April 17th, 2014

European Landscape Photography Afterglow

European Landscape Photography Afterglow

An ideal picture to have as a framed print piece of wall art.
Available from http://alex-saunders.artistwebsites.com or Fine Art America

Framed Print Wall Art Afterglow

This picture was taken on a warm evening in May, at the waters edge within the grounds of The St George Hotel, in the outskirts of Paphos, Cyprus.

Paphos enjoys a subtropical-semi-arid climate, with the greatest amounts of precipitation mainly occurring from mid-November to March. It practically never rains in the summer, (with an average of 0.1). In July and August, humidity measurements can go up to 85%.

Snowfall occurs rarely, approximately every 10 years, and does not normally lead to any significant disruption. Snowfall does occur in the hills of Tsada, 6 km north, almost annually. The last significant snowfall in the city centre occurred in the winter of 2001.

Heat waves in July and August are relatively common, when hot air masses from the Sahara desert drift over to Cyprus causing temperatures to rise. Cyprus has experienced drought-like conditions and the current trend of global warming may increase the severity of these conditions. In the summer of 2008, Cyprus had to ship water by tanker from Greece to meet demand on the island. However, since then, water conditions have eased due to good winter rains. Wikipedia

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Landscape Photos Grasmere Lake District England

April 17th, 2014

Landscape Photos Grasmere Lake District England

Grasmere Lake District England.

The poet William Wordsworth, who lived in Grasmere for fourteen years, described it as "the loveliest spot that man hath ever found". Before 1974, Grasmere lay within the former county of Westmorland, but today it is part of the county of Cumbria. Grasmere is a village, and popular tourist destination, in the centre of the English Lake District. It takes its name from the adjacent lake, and is associated with the Lake Poets.

Today's Grasmere Gingerbread is made to a "secret recipe" popularized by Sarah Nelson (1815-1904). By the early nineteenth century, Grasmere gingerbread was already being sold as fairings, as well as being a popular seller in its own right. Poet Dorothy Wordsworth wrote in 1803 that she and her brother William yearned for the gingerbread. Wikipedia

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Piazza San Marco

April 12th, 2014

Piazza San Marco

Piazza San Marco Venice Italy this image is not actually in the Piazza San Marco, it was taken at the entrance to the Piazza known as the Piazzetta di San Marco looking towards the waters of the lagoon. The Piazzetta lies between the Doge’s Palace on the east and Jacopo Sansovino’s Libreria which holds the Biblioteca Marciana on the west. Wikipedia
Are you looking for a piece of landscape photography wall art of a place that rekindles your emotions or special memories ?

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Lighthouse Crinan Canal

March 27th, 2014

Lighthouse Crinan Canal

The Crinan Canal between Crinan and Ardrishaig in Argyll in the west of Scotland is operated by Scottish Canals. The canal takes its name from the village of Crinan at its westerly end. Nine miles (14 km) long, it connects the village of Ardrishaig on Loch Gilp with the Sound of Jura, providing a navigable route between the Clyde and the Inner Hebrides, without the need for a long diversion around the Kintyre peninsula, and in particular the exposed Mull of Kintyre. The canal is 10 ft (3.0 m) deep and has essentially no height limit.

Are you looking for a piece of landscape photography wall art of a place that rekindles your emotions or special memories ?

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Sunset Isle of Jura Scotland

March 23rd, 2014

Sunset Isle of Jura Scotland

Loch Crinan is a seawater loch on the West of Scotland, leading into the Sound of Jura and being the western end of the Crinan Canal. The village of Crinan is at the entrance to the canal at the eastern end of the loch. Duntrune Castle stands on the northern shore. The River Add goes into it by the hamlet of Bellanoch.
It contains the islets of An-unalin, Black Rock, Eilean dà Mhèinn, Eilean Glas, and Eilean nan Coinean.

I only sell my images through my Fine Art America artist website. Fine Art America will print, frame, dispatch, collect your payment and include their 30 day guarantee of a full refund.

I believe that by using Fine Art America to handle your purchase, you will be reassured that your payment is secure and your chosen piece of wall art will be delivered as per Fine Art America's delivery schedule.

Are you looking for a piece of landscape photography wall art of a place that rekindles your emotions or special memories ?

I specialize as a special memories photographer, capturing landscape images of these special locations that my clients have requested.

Use the Contact page to email me if you are interested in having your special memories image created.

 

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